AgriLawn's Green Scene Blog

AgriLawn's Green Scene Blog

Be On the Lookout for Grubs!

Matt on July 26, 2017

A few weeks ago some parts of town were dealing with extraordinary amounts of May/June Beetles.  It was a buzz on social media and even a couple of news reports covering this.  May/June Beetles are the clumsy flying, sticky legged, bright light attracted big brown bugs that seem to spend more time on their backs than they do in the air.  They’re also one of the beetles responsible for the white grub worms soon to be munching on our lawn’s already stressed out roots.  Head’s up to the homeowners in these May/June Bug heavy areas in town.  These areas may be susceptible to heavy grub worm activity soon as well.  Be on the lookout and scout the lawn frequently as we head deeper into the summer and the early fall.  Look out for:

  • Wet, spongy under your feet feeling areas (as grubs deplete root mass, these areas collapse as you walk over them)
  • Increased critter activity and digging (skunks, raccoons, moles and birds feed on grub worms and can wreak some havoc doing it)
  • Brown, irregular patches (as roots are severed, the top vegetation dies)

If you see any of these signs, get down, grab two fistfuls of turf and give it a tug.  If the damage is becoming serious the turf comes up fairly easily because it’s no longer attached to some or most of its roots.  Often, but certainly not always, this occurs sooner in areas well-lighted at night (under street lights, landscape lights, porch and patio lighting).

Should treatment be necessary we can definitely help out.  Please give us a call if you suspect you may have a problem.  Treatment is recommended when grubs at damaging levels are visually confirmed (generally 10 or more per sq. ft. for a healthy lawn or 6 to 8 or more per sq. ft. with turf having other stress).  I’d also recommend preventative treatment for lawns having grub problems/damage seemingly every year.  


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